Services

Knowing Is the Battle 

Soldiers are explicitly trained for combat.

Their psychiatrists should be, too.

Increased demand for care and a nationwide shortage of qualified mental health practitioners – particularly those sensitive to the unique needs of America’s fighting men and women – has created an epidemic surrounding mental health and PTSD support for veterans throughout the United States.

Currently, no provision exists within the VA to ensure that their own providers or the community health professionals upon whom our veterans and their families rely are appropriately trained to treat veterans, and studies have found that many veterans are not properly diagnosed with PTSD nor treated appropriately once diagnosed..

A thorough knowledge of what it means to be military is essential to helping our service men and women.

Veteran Health Services will offer comprehensive mental and behavioral health services for America’s veterans and their families, and ALL will be provided by clinicians who are specifically trained in military culture and veteran-related issues.

Click through below to find out more about the services provided by Veteran Health Services:

PTSD Support for Veterans

According to the RAND Center for Military Health Policy Research, of the 1.7 million veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, approximately 300,000 suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Fifty percent, overall, do not seek treatment.

PTSD is occurring at alarming rates, and “unknown soldiers” all too often have names.

Through PTSD support for veterans, we will endeavor to address the various roots and causes of PTSD, including, but not limited to, military sexual trauma and traumatic brain injuries – both of which have been linked to the disorder.

Above all, we will send the message that help is available to our veterans, and that they are not alone in their fight. Our heroes should never have to hide.

Substance Abuse Counseling

The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that nearly 13,000 veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan have alcohol dependence syndrome. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Organization, 1.8 million veterans overall meet the criteria for a substance abuse disorder.

By fostering collaboration between our veterans, their families, our health care providers, and other support services, we can mitigate the negative impact their service can have and improve outcomes for our heroes and their families.

Family Counseling

It’s never easy, holding down the fort at home. The impact on a family during deployment is tremendous, and is far from one-sided. The difficulty of reintegrating to civilian life can often be compounded by the mental or behavioral health issues suffered by a veteran’s spouse or children as a direct or indirect result of their loved one’s service.

To promote complete healing, Veteran Health Services will focus on the veteran and the veteran’s family in an environment that is contemporary and comforting and designed to promote open channels of communication.

Telehealth

Trauma does not adhere to a schedule. Veterans with mental health issues, including PTSD and depression, struggle night and day, some existing on little to no sleep due to nights plagued with memories of their past service.

At Veteran Health Services, veterans will be provided exclusive access to a crisis hotline that connects them to a licensed specialist who will not just read from a script. They will be available whenever the veteran needs to talk, for whatever reason, and, in the not too distant future, our veterans will be able to connect via telehealth so that they can see as well as hear the person on the other end of that life-line.

Mobile Health Application

G6 Mobile Health, a company owned by Veteran Health Services founder, Dr. Goldberg, is developing a real-time mobile application to empower veterans by providing them access to their personalized treatment plans. The app will also allow patients to monitor and record their responses to medications, in addition to their symptoms, triggers, and reactions to treatment. The app will allow health providers to obtain invaluable input from approved family members and friends, thus allowing them to feel they can contribute to their loved one’s recovery, while not being intrusive into the confidential and therapeutic relationship between the veteran and their provider.

In essence, by providing a birds-eye-view of a patient’s day-to-day struggles, the use of this application is expected to not just improve outcomes, but to do it in a more timely, efficient, and meaningful way.